Concordia

Picturesque Concordia is located only 30 miles east of Mazatlán. It has maintained its colonial architecture and ambience with its narrow streets and wood-burnt tile roofs, a perfect backdrop to the town’s lush tropical vegetation.  Concordia is famous for its Raspados de Leche Quemada (caramel milk snow cones), and the traditional Birria dish of this region. Concordia and surrounding villages are well-known for the manufacture of a great variety of furniture, uniquely hand-crafted from wood indigenous to this region.

Concordia is nowadays an excellent choice for those in search of picturesque sites as old colonial houses and cobblestone alleys reflecting the history and culture through town customs and architecture. Among the many tourist attractions found in  Concordia are the San Sebastian Church, an architectural jewel dating from the 17th Century.

This beautiful town is located southeast of Mazatlan. Its singular beauty lies in its well-preserved colonial architecture, by which it has earned it reputation as one of the most interesting tourist spots outside Mazatlan – come and soak up the historic flavor of this charming colonial wonder.

The town currently has slightly less than ten-thousand inhabitants and, due to its historic and cultural heritage, Catholicism prevails as the faith of choice for most natives. Its name means “Place of Conformity and Union.” This derives from historic events relating to its former incarnation as “La Villa De San Sebastian” or San Sebastian Village. Founded in the 16th Century, the village's name was changed in 1828 to “Concordia” by decree issued by the Occidental State Legislature, and was declared so-named in accordance with a peace agreement between two Masonic brotherhoods in conflict at the time. The credit for the founding of the town in 1565 was accorded Captain Francisco De Ibarra, who was acknowledged for prominence in the mining industry based in his discovery and exploitation of gold and silver. He died in El Mineral De Pánuco on August 17th, 1575.

In 1616, the oldest settlers, the majority of whom were from indigenous tribes, took up arms against the Spanish Crown, which resulted in the collapse of the mining industry in Copala. Two centuries thereafter, the War of Independence began in San Sebastian, following the triumph of the insurgents in El Rosario on December 27th, 1810. The year 1865 saw the French invasion of the State of Sinaloa, the incursion beginning in Durango and extending into Concordia. The French looted and torched villages, and burned the former Concordia, La Villa De San Sebastian, to the ground.

Nowadays, Concordia's inhabitants are devoted mainly to carpentry, pottery and agriculture, occupations inherited from their ancestors. Due to its cultural and historic wealth, Concordia is nowadays an excellent choice for those in search of picturesque sites which reflect the history and culture through town customs and architecture. Among the many tourist attractions found in Concordia are the San Sebastian Church, an architectural jewel dating from the 17th Century -- its old colonial houses and cobblestone alleys are a valuable legacy of rich Spanish heritage.

Concordia has many excellent options for lodging as well as gastronomic experiences, for those seeking to explore and spend a day or two absorbing the atmosphere of a fascinating colonial town.

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